Our Team

Emily Glynn

Founding President

History
Third Year, George Stephenson College

Hi! I am Emily, the Founder of ‘History in Politics’. After working on an independent research project with the Laidlaw Foundation Leadership and Research Scholarship, I felt the conversation on the pertinence of history in politics was an important one to explore. The use of history in politics often goes unchallenged; with phrases like we “learn from the past” a cliché many of us are guilty of including in our Personal Statements. Instead I hope to de-familiarise such a standard narrative, create interdisciplinary engagement and question the use and relevance of history in politics.

Maximus McCabe-Abel

Vice-President

History
Second Year, College of St Hild & St Bede

The use of history within politics is significantly understated but hugely important. Considered rather out of place in the domain of modern politics, the use of history doesn’t necessarily equal backward thinking. The notion that history repeats itself is one that attests to the wider interdisciplinarity between the past and politics, but it is one which undoubtedly deserves closer and more serious attention.

Amelia Crick

Treasurer

History & Politics
Second Year, College of St Hild & St Bede

The importance of the relationship between History and Politics became clear to me whilst in Westminster shadowing my local MP. I had the opportunity to explore the ways in which the intersection of history and politics allowed Commons Select Committees to scrutinise new legislation. Having seen the analytical tools of my studies in practice, it was clear that the relationship between History and Politics is important beyond academic study!

Betty Lorimer

Head of Publicity

History
Third Year, Hatfield College

The link between history and politics is often simplified and distorted. All too often, particularly in the press, the link between the two disciplines is misused in attempts to draw somewhat misguided patrolled which make appealing headlines. In such turbulent political times, it is crucial we examine our understanding of history within politics, both to fully understand how the present was constructed and to allow us to deconstruct complex political phenomena. I’m thrilled to be part of a society which seeks to rigorously challenge normative assumptions surrounding history in politics.

Anna Shepherd

Junior Publicity

English Literature & History
Third Year, University College

I’m really excited to be involved in this project because I think the links across history and today’s politics will be quite surprising, providing a real lens into the human psyche and reactivity of societies over time.  I believe history is one of the best ways to examine what, as a society, we are great at and where our limitations seem to consistently lie across all sectors and causes.

Edward Selwyn-Sharpe

Event Manager

History
Second Year, Van Mildert College

It’s hard to avoid politics – from Brexit, to Donald Trump ‘joking’ about injecting bleach. Meanwhile, the comparisons with history fills newspapers, and is bandied about debates. As debates become more polarised it seems imperative we stop taking the relationship for granted, step back and gain some perspective. In the process, hopefully we’ll discuss some interesting ideas and give history in politics the space it deserves.

Lauren Shale

Social Director

History
Third Year, John Snow College

Although history and politics go together so naturally, I believe it is really important to explore in greater depth how they interacted, both in the past and in the present day. I hope that through our events we will open up interesting areas of debate to develop ideas surrounding the topic across a variety of disciplines.


Ellie Williams-Brown

Senior Editor

English Literature & History
Second Year, St Aidan’s College

History and politics are intertwined; one is usually needed to understand the other. Whether looking at current events or at key historical moments, it is clear the two use similar language and ideas. I believe we cannot passively utilise such concepts and must examine their similarities and how they feed off each other.

Rosa Bruce

Creative Director

Spanish & Russian
Fourth Year, College of St Hild & St Bede

As a language student, it is important to consider the role of history in politics in order to better understand people from different countries and cultures, and to consider why groups of people make decisions today based on their understanding of their own country’s and people’s past. I’m looking forward to opening up an interesting discourse that will help us to reconsider global politics in this context.

Hazel Laurenson

Editor

History
Third Year, Van Mildert College

Examining History and Politics together gives cognitive diversity the emphasis it so often lacks, as the narrow scope of academia currently promoted undermines potential for progress and development. Vital lessons can be learnt from history which no theorist could predict, a point which twentieth century history especially encapsulates. The relationship between the past and the present is thus of paramount value, especially as we advance into – arguably – unprecedented times.

Emerald McLaughlin

Editor

History, Politics & Philosophy (Liberal Arts)
Second Year, John Snow College

History is not a fixed body of facts and I am particularly interested in how its use in politics can shape national identities and political loyalties. Examining the use of history in politics helps us to recognise the subtext of political ideas. Why does Putin want to revive the Cossack? Why does Brexit place importance on Britain’s imperial past? Examining the use of history in politics enables us to further understand how our beliefs about what happened the past influences the future.

Ariana Fanning

Editor

History
Third Year, George Stephenson College

In order to understand the politics of today, you have to be aware of the historical past that led up to current events. Not only does history allow for a better insight into today’s politics, but lessons of the past must be learnt in order to envision a better future. I’m excited to be a part of this project as it offers a new platform for discussing the relationship between history and politics.

Joseph Callow

Editor

History
Third Year, Van Mildert College

How we choose to see the past, and by extension the present, is an overtly political act. In looking to history to explain current affairs we are necessarily selective, each of us seeking out those events and processes which fit with the narratives we hope to construct. What parts of history we draw upon, and how the narratives we create interact with contemporary politics on all levels, are topics which demand further attention.

Sophie Koch

Editor

Philosophy, Politics and Economics
Second Year, John Snow College

Politics is enriched by an informed understanding of historical context and specificities. Without this, subtle nuances and patterns in culture, economics, themes, trends and events can be missed or misconstrued to further biased narratives. With some politicians believing they can actively rewrite the recent past, a critical view of politics through a historical lens is imperative in distinguishing between objective & normative truths, identity politics and dogma. I believe by identifying these details and nuances, we can use history to see the bigger picture in politics.